Episode #2: Hand Tools for Every Shop

For new woodworkers looking to start a hand tool shop or experienced power tool users looking to incorporate more hand work into their projects, selecting tools can be a daunting task. There are literally thousands of different hand tools out there to choose from and without at least some experience using the tools, it’s hard to know which ones to get first.

In Episode # 2, I discuss my recommendations for a basic set of hand tools that no shop should be without. I based my recommendations on someone starting up a hand tool shop but if you use some power tools in your shop, I’ve also noted which tools may not be as useful to you for tasks where you would be using power.

My list of recommended tools is by no means all inclusive, but it should be sufficient to give you a good start. You can add tools and skills in the future as your projects dictate and you discover your own favorite techniques and methods.


 

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17 thoughts on “Episode #2: Hand Tools for Every Shop

    • Thanks Stephen! No, she didn’t eat the glue pot but you couldn’t tell by looking at her. She definately lives the good life :D. The dogs do love hide glue though. Any time I heat up the pot they come strolling in, noses in the air. I have to watch them, my other dog already ate a big chunk of beeswax on me.

  1. I’m just curious. About how much time do you spend woodworking per week? What do you do with your projects? Gift them? sell them? keep them? Thanks for the great video. Please keep them coming.

    • Nathan,
      Really, how much time I spend in the shop on a weekly basis changes based on my family’s schedule. Some weeks, I get more time than others. This week I probably spent only an hour or so in the shop. Most of my time spent in the shop is at night for an hour or so after my daughters go to bed or on the weekends if it’s not nice outside. I don’t really watch TV so when most other folks are watching American Idol, I’m in the shop. Regarding my projects, it depends on what it was built for. If I built it specifically for us then we keep it. Sometimes I gift items and on very rare occasions I might sell a piece. I do have a day job though so I rarely sell a piece. They’re usually just done for our own house or for close friends and family for the cost of materials.

  2. Excellent podcast. I just stumbled on your site because of a Google Reader recommendation. I am so excited that you have joined the podcasting community. The film quality and resolution as well as your content are going to keep the rest of us on our toes. It is obvious you put a lot of work into these two episodes and I thank you for spending the time to do it. I just released my 42nd episode over at the Renaissance Woodworker and rarely have I achieved the quality of content and presentation that you did with your first two episodes. Keep it up you have a new loyal watcher!

    • Shannon,
      Thanks for all of the compliments in all three podcast posts. I do check out your podcast pretty regularly and I do think you are selling yourself short. You do a fantastic job with your podcast. Regarding the equipment, it’s really not what you might think. Currently, I’m just using the video function of our still camera. It works but the sound quality is awful. I have plans to purchase a real digital video camera and lavalier mic in the future but we have had some unforseen expenses in the last few months which have delayed that purchase. So for now I’m just using the still camera’s video function, which works ok.

      Regarding the editing, I’m just using the Microsoft Windows Movie Maker package that comes with most versions of Windows now. Again, nothing special. I’m not computer savvy enough to use anything too complicated :).

  3. Great video, Bob! Very informative. One question though–how well does that bench dog work? 😉

    One benefit of having a shop full of handtools is that if the power goes out, you don’t have to stop woodworking, as long as you have some candles and/or flashlight. I found this out first hand and was delighted with the realization.

  4. Nice job! I’m impressed with how natural and relaxed you sound. I also loved the text “save” on the dovetail saw part – very honest, and much better than redoing the whole section. I’m looking forward to watching the next episode.

  5. Great work!
    Do you have have to take account of the humidity and movement in the wood? Or is this so small that it can be ignored?

    • I wouldn’t say that I can ignore wood movement in the tools, however, I don’t worry about it unless it affects my work. I don’t observe a lot of movement in my tools as my shop is indoors and climate controlled. However, I do check tools like squares and straightedges frequently and correct them if necessary. The planes I don’t worry about unless they begin to have issues in use, which typically doesn’t happen in my shop after the initial cleanup and tuning is done since it is climate controlled.

  6. Hi There,

    The website calls these podcasts, but I can’t seem to figure out how to download these. I always understood podcasts to be downloadable.

    Are the videos only watchable online, or are they, in fact, downloadable ?

    Thanks,
    Terry

    • Hi Terry,
      You can indeed download the videos. In most modern browsers, you should see a “Download Video” button pop up when you hover over the vieo window. If you don’t get this option, you can click on the Itunes Podcast Feed under Subscribe in the sidebar at left. Alternatively, you can go into the Itunes store, search for Hand TOols & Techniques in the podcasts section, and subscribe from there. Itunes will then download the episodes to your machine, where they can then be transferred to your mobile device.

  7. Hi Bob,

    Thank you for posting these very interesting and educational podcasts. As a relative newcomer to woodworking who has been working almost exclusively with handtools from the start, I’ve gained a lot from watching and reading what you’ve put up on the site. evry importantly, it’s very inspiring so watch someone else with a job and a family juggle woodworking into this busy schedule – I can definitely relate! Thanks very much, and please keep up the terrific work.

    P.S. I watch your podcast from halfway across the world – you’ve gone very international!

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